The Echoes

Filed under Sports

Open season

DUCK%2C+DUCK%2C+GOOSE.+From+left+to+right+seniors+Ethan+Aschenbrenner%2C+Heston+Gorr%2C+Josh+Schroder%2C+and+Lance+Knight+all+reached+their+limits+and+had+a+successful+day+on+a+goose+hunt+earlier+this+fall.
DUCK, DUCK, GOOSE. From left to right seniors Ethan Aschenbrenner, Heston Gorr, Josh Schroder, and Lance Knight all reached their limits and had a successful day on a goose hunt earlier this fall.

DUCK, DUCK, GOOSE. From left to right seniors Ethan Aschenbrenner, Heston Gorr, Josh Schroder, and Lance Knight all reached their limits and had a successful day on a goose hunt earlier this fall.

Courtesy photo

Courtesy photo

DUCK, DUCK, GOOSE. From left to right seniors Ethan Aschenbrenner, Heston Gorr, Josh Schroder, and Lance Knight all reached their limits and had a successful day on a goose hunt earlier this fall.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






At 6:15 am on any given school day, junior Zach Ansley dreads getting out of bed.

Miraculously, that all changes on certain weekend mornings in the late fall and early winter. If Ansley was getting up to go on a hunt, he would’ve eagerly jumped out of bed.

While hunters typically have no problem getting up early for a big hunt, it’s much different than getting up for school.

“It’s different because I want to hunt and I don’t want to go to school. For me, hunting is just more enjoyable and rewarding. You put in all this work in a short amount of time. You set out your decoys, you fight through the weather and then you shoot all these birds and it’s super rewarding, or you go out and shoot this big buck,” Ansley said.

“It’s more rewarding than school because yeah you get a diploma, but it takes four years to accomplish,” Ansley said. Hunting, however, offers instant gratification.

Ansley was first introduced to the world of hunting at a young age..

“My grandpa got me interested in hunting. I hunted with him when I was about four, but I shot my first animal when I was 7,” he said.

Because hunting is such a skilled and technical sport, Ansley would be the first to tell you that it has the ability to create a lot of strong bonds.

“A lot of my friends I have now, I know we wouldn’t be as good as friends if we didn’t hunt together. It’s so relaxing and you’re not in the mind frame of a high schooler or trying to become an adult,” Ansley said.

Ansley compared the hunting experience to the camaraderie that an athletic team might share.

“It’s extremely rewarding when you’re successful. It’s similar to when a basketball team wins a game that team gets closer every time they win. It’s the same with us when we go out and shoot when we shoot our limit and have great days. When we have bad days and aren’t as successful and learn what we need to do better, we grow as friends, we grow as hunters, and we grow as people,” he said.

But before he could go on these hunts and create a lifetime of memories, he first had to take some safety precautions.

As a matter of fact, before anyone can legally hunt in Nebraska, they must successfully complete the hunter’s safety course.

“I’ve gone through a hunter’s safety course which is fine for basic firearms. But I also archery hunt, so I had to go through bow hunter’s safety. I’ve gone through both of those, but you just have to be careful. You can pass both the tests on common sense if you’re safe and paying attention, “ Ansley said.

“I’ve had friends that have lost fingers and hands and I know people that have gotten seriously injured. One of my close friends had a gun blow up on him just a couple years ago so you just have to really be careful and pay attention at all times, and it’s mostly common sense,” he said.

Junior Blake Greckel shared some helpful hunting safety insights that he and many others use to stay safe.

“You never point the gun at someone else, you always have the gun on safety, you make sure it’s unloaded when you’re in a vehicle, just everything you can to make sure everyone is safe and nobody gets shot,” Greckel said.

Senior Josh Schroeder is also an avid hunter.

“I’ve been hunting since kindergarten with my dad. I like hunting geese but i’ll hunt anything. Deer, geese, ducks, and pheasants are all probably my favorites,” Schroeder said.

Saturday Nov.11, was opening season for geese, which tends to be the animal of choice for most hunters.

“I like deer but it’s a quick and done thing so I’m more into water fowl and ducks and geese,” Ansley said.

Greckel, though,  enjoys coyote hunting the most.

“I like hunting coyotes. It’s fun and we help conserve animal populations. A lot of ranchers let us hunt on their land because of the coyote populations. Coyotes kill a lot of calves and calves cost $1,000 which is a lot of money,” he said.

Greckel has also encountered a bobcat on one of his many hunts.

“One of my most memorable hunts was the time I shot a bobcat. It was super windy and we just started calling and i looked up onto a cliff and I saw a bobcat. So I shot it and it jumped off the cliff,” Greckel said.

Hunting is a significant part of the community, and many individual partake in this daunting sport.

“I just like the experience. Being able to be out with friends and getting to work with animals and trying to call them in is just fun,” Schroeder said.

For Ansley, it’s more of a relaxation period.

“It’s a challenge that you have to work at and it’s never easy but you just go out into the field and you don’t have to worry about what anyone else is doing or thinking. There’s no social media, there’s no stress, it’s just you and nature and it’s really relaxing,” he said.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
The student news site of Scottsbluff High School
Open season